Start A new kettle of fish dating

A new kettle of fish dating

If you need these ask your librarain to help you find a copy.] "In 1621 Edward Winslow reported to a friend back in England concerning the Plymouth settlement that "our Bay is full of Lobsters all the Summer." In Salem a few years later, Francis Higginson observed that "the least Boy in the Plantation may both catch and eat what he will of" lobters.

In fact English man-about-town Samuel Pepys's diary records than an elegant dinner he thew in 1663 included a fricassee of rabbit and chickens, carp, lamb, pigeons, various pies and four lobsters..

Lobster was cooked either by roasting, boiling or by removing the meat from the shell and cooking it separately." ---Food in Early Modern Europe, Ken Albala [Greenwood Press: Westport CT] 2003 (p.

198) "So the Romans who came to Britain [43 AD] and who lived within reach of the sea must have been very happy to enjoy the local seafhish...seafoods such as crab and lobster were taken. 21) "Lobster, crayfish and crab were greatly enjoyed [in mid-fifteenth century Britain], though they seldom reached the inland eater...

No delicacy, American lobsters were nonetheless better received than many shellfish.

Anne Wilson [Academy Chicago: Chicago] 1991 "Lobster, much as today, was considered especially elegant and appropriate food for lovers, being an aphrodesiac.

There is a common perception that lobster was considered a poor man's food, and this many have been in the case in colonial New England but not back in Europe.

Boiled lobsters were served cold with dressing, not hot and "in the rough," as we are most likely to encounter them today.