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Chronological dating

In Egyptology the method was first used by Petrie for dating the Naqada period, from the development of the so-called wavy-handled pottery.

Kinglists in Greek, apparently compiled by a third century BC Egyptian priest named Manetho, are preserved in summaries by early Christian writers, with excerpts in other writers of the Roman Period and later, notably the Jewish historian Josephus.

For their own religious and administrative purposes, the Egyptians compiled lists of kings, sometimes with the exact length of reign.

Fragments of such lists survived ('Palermo stone'); none of them is well enough preserved to solve every detail of absolute chronology.

Typological dating may foster the tendency to assume that each step in development is of about the same time length, but this does not need to be the case in reality.

All living organic materials contain Carbon-14 atoms in a constant number.

First used, and likely invented by archaeologist Sir William Flinders-Petrie in 1899, seriation (or sequence dating) is based on the idea that artifacts change over time.

Like tail fins on a Cadillac, artifact styles and characteristics change over time, coming into fashion, then fading in popularity. The standard graphical result of seriation is a series of "battleship curves," which are horizontal bars representing percentages plotted on a vertical axis.

For a long period in the 20th century Egyptian and Near Eastern chronology seemed to be the earliest of absolute chronologies, and imports from these areas were used to reconstruct the chronology of European prehistory.


 
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03-Apr-2020 03:34